Adverb

Adverbs modify adjectives, verbs and other adverbs. Here are instances where the modifications are made:

(a) Modify adjectives:

He is happy now.
(adj.) (adv.)

(b) Modify verbs:

He smiles happily.
(verb)  (adv.)

(c) Modify other adverbs:

He smiles happily now.
(adv.)  (adv.)

An adverb answers the questions:

  • Where?
  • When?
  • How?
  • How often?
  • To what extent?

Examples:

  1. Wait here (Where? Here). I’ll look for him. He could be anywhere (Where? Anywhere).
  2. The principal wants to see you now. (When? Now.)
  3. The speaker spoke softly, so that we couldn’t hear him. (How did he speak? Softly.)
  4. Siva always goes jogging (How often? Always.); he never plays any games. (How often? Never.)
  5. The buildings were completely damaged after the earthquake. (To what extent? Completely)

Take note:

Many adverbs end in -ly. However, the word hard cannot be changed to hardly. The reason is, the word hardly has a completely different meaning although both are adverbs.  Observe these sentences:

  • Samantha studies hard. = [Samantha studies many hours each day.]
  • Samantha hardly studies. = [Samantha doesn’t study at all, or maybe very little.]
  • Samantha studies hardly. (X) – no meaning
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Posted on July 9, 2009, in Word Classes and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. how to make sentence using word “well” using adverb….

    • Examples of using “well” as an adverb:

      1. Do you job well, and you’ll be handsomely rewarded.
      2. You will be ill if you do not eat well.
      3. He can’t speak Mandarin very well because he’s a foreigner.
      4. If you know me well, you should know my dislikes.

      TQ Azizi for the question, and sorry for the delay in responding to your query. 🙂

  2. Whats up! I simply want to give a huge thumbs up for the good data you’ve here on this post. I will likely be coming again to your weblog for more soon.

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